Latest Reviews

NO TIME TO CRY is one of those crime novels where you feel you are in very safe hands only a few pages in. Scottish
Posted by Andrea Thompson
If you're in the market for something a little bit different with that historical perspective, then it's worth having a look at.
Posted by Karen
After a lot of hints from others, I've finally gotten around to the Eddie Flynn series by author Steve Cavanagh and like an idiot I've started in at the fourth novel in the series.
Posted by Karen
Modern relationships are hideously complicated and hats off to BELIEVE ME, as this thriller takes that certainty to a whole new level of dangerous complexity.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
We could perhaps say ‘plot twist’ or ‘pivot’ (you know, to be irritating like the cool kids) but either way you are getting a bit more bang for your buck than usual with THE RIVAL.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Fitting neatly in a growing rural noir subgenre, Greenlight manages to explore issues that go beyond place in ways that are both interesting and which impact organically with the plot.
Posted by Robert Goodman
... this is good rural-noir. It comes from the place and the people that it's written about and it's got the authority, and the touch that comes from living in the world that it's describing.
Posted by Karen
After coming to it unconvinced by the cover / the comparisons to other books and franchises, which frankly were a turnoff, I'm happy to report that this is an impressive debut.
Posted by Karen

Recommendations

... this is good rural-noir. It comes from the place and the people that it's written about and it's got the authority, and the touch that comes from living in the world that it's describing.
Completing the AustCrimeFiction trifecta, my turn to read this excellent debut novel.
Cop-turned novelist, Nathan Blackwell (true identity hidden due to covert police operations) has written a debut novel, THE SOUND OF HER VOICE, which is intense, unsparing, realistic, brutal and will stay with the reader for a long time.
If you're a fan of any of Stuart MacBride's books - the Logan McRae series, the Ash Henderson series, his Christmas series (I kid you not), or his standalones then you will have hot footed it to the bookshop for this one already. If for some reason you missed it, then off you go.
THE FAMILY NEXT DOOR reinforces the notion that despite being constantly surrounded by people, you can often feel alone. Deep suburbia provides such a huge source of material and is finally in drama fiction being recognized for that richness.
Where are the women here? They support, they assist – and they prosecute. Accused of raping a young woman in an elevator at Parliament, James is suddenly no longer bullet proof. His wife is no longer by his side. His government may no longer be so benevolent. Those he crossed in the past will no longer be silent.
It has been a very long time since Anna has been able to put foot outside her own door. But this does not mean that she does not observe life outside.
The good news is I'm so far behind with this review, that the second book in the series is out now. Which means you've got a series on your hands!

Latest Postings

Book Review
NO TIME TO CRY is one of those crime novels where you feel you are in very safe hands only a few pages in. Scottish
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Books
Posted by Karen
Book Review
If you're in the market for something a little bit different with that historical perspective, then it's worth having a look at.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
After a lot of hints from others, I've finally gotten around to the Eddie Flynn series by author Steve Cavanagh and like an idiot I've started in at the fourth novel in the series.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Modern relationships are hideously complicated and hats off to BELIEVE ME, as this thriller takes that certainty to a whole new level of dangerous complexity.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
We could perhaps say ‘plot twist’ or ‘pivot’ (you know, to be irritating like the cool kids) but either way you are getting a bit more bang for your buck than usual with THE RIVAL.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
Fitting neatly in a growing rural noir subgenre, Greenlight manages to explore issues that go beyond place in ways that are both interesting and which impact organically with the plot.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Book Review
... this is good rural-noir. It comes from the place and the people that it's written about and it's got the authority, and the touch that comes from living in the world that it's describing.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
After coming to it unconvinced by the cover / the comparisons to other books and franchises, which frankly were a turnoff, I'm happy to report that this is an impressive debut.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Sometimes it's good to step outside the fictional world and see where the form has come from, and the impacts had as a result.
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Flynn Berry burst on the crime thriller scene with her page-turning debut Under the Harrow, a book with a female narrator who may have been a little unhinged but was not unreliable.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Books
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Move over Scandi-crime and possibly even Aussie-crime – the next wave of page-turning, gut wrenching, crime fiction might well be coming out of Korea.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Blog entry
Backcountry mystery outshone big city crime at WORD Christchurch Festival on Saturday evening as Alan Carter and Jennifer Lane were named the winners of the 2018 Ngaio Marsh Awards.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Claire is someone who appreciates fully the value of her privacy. There are many good reasons for that; the least of it being that Claire is not the name the London doctor was born with.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Blog entry
This is the latest in the rural noir pile, and 50 or so pages in feels like a very good entry indeed.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
In our ears it’s all quietly confessed secrets and the discovery of lies as we move around with producer Jack Quick in the shadows of a country town. This is not necessarily a sleepy town. This is wine country.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Blog entry
Post the #neddies it is sometimes hard to get back in the reading groove, so I'm starting with something rather different from what I'd normally contemplate going near. So far the plan is working...
Posted by Karen
Blog entry
From the just finished pile.
Posted by Karen
Blog entry
Thank you Peter Corris, thank you.
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
Blog entry
The Australian Crime Writers Association (ACWA) announced the winners of the 2018 Ned Kelly Awards at a packed event at the Melbourne Writers’ Festival on 26 August.
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Rural seems to be the new black in Australian crime fiction.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Books
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
Blog entry
Big change of pace, but I'm actually reading something written by someone who is not from our neck of the woods!
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Always present, always watching. The Tall Man comes for your daughters. What to do when you have given yourself over to the Tall Man, and then you have a daughter of your own? You disappear.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
RETRIBUTION is an elegantly written novel that convincingly takes the reader to a place of both great beauty and deep ugliness.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Blog entry
From the heaving great pile of reading matter that I'm very behind with.
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Completing the AustCrimeFiction trifecta, my turn to read this excellent debut novel.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Fans of MADE TO KILL will already know all about Ray Electromatic, Ada and his line of work.
Posted by Karen
Blog entry
I've been wanting to read this interesting analysis for sometime now so yesterday sat down and did so.
Posted by Karen
Blog entry
We are nothing if not predictable here at AustCrimeFiction - and it's my turn to read this now.
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
Book Review
It has been another great year for Australian crime debuts and Derval McTiernan’s The Rùin continues this run. Much like Adrian McKinty, McTiernan sets her first Cormac Reilly novel in the old country, aka Ireland. But her take, while still procedural, is more contemporary and less overtly political.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Book Review
DIG TWO GRAVES relies heavily on a descriptive, languid writing style, full of portents and observations, internal musings and a lot of that angst, longing and regret. This will be a novel that works incredibly well for fans of that style.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Author Michalia Arathimos has Greek-New Zealand heritage which is strongly reflected in her novel AUKATI. Set in New Zealand, this is a crime novel based around the scourge that is fracking.
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Australian Rural Crime novels are the new big thing, and Scrublands is the one that everyone is talking about.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Feeling very much like an advertisement for gourmet South Australia with a slightly incongruous crime fiction element (wouldn't that turn potential visitors off...) THE POPEYE MURDER by Sandra Winter-Dewhirst is the first Rebecca Keith mystery.
Posted by Karen