All Reviews

Third in the Dan Forrester series, we're into classic thriller mode now with this series.
Posted by Karen
...populated by more than enough sub-plots and intrigue to keep a reader on their toes.
Posted by Karen
Australian readers will probably remember C.J. Carver as Caroline Carver - writer of a series of Australian set books years ago.
Posted by Karen
This was without a doubt, one of the most intriguing books I've encountered this year and it reminded me, yet again, that Antti Tuomainen is a writer who deserves (and now has) a much higher position on the must read list.
Posted by Karen
Another one of those quintessentially Scottish sounding audible books - perfect for listening to over an extended period of time.
Posted by Karen
It's a mark of Robotham's skill that he's inserted THE SECRET SHE KEEPS into a crowded domestic noir scene, littered with unreliable narrators, dysfunctional families and tension because of poor judgements, and created an extremely readable, quite chilling, page turning entrant.
Posted by Karen
3rd in the Discworld series - listened to during the year.
Posted by Karen
2nd in the Discworld series - listened to during the year.
Posted by Karen
Another series I've restarted in audio format.
Posted by Karen
A real act of terrorism in Sydney in the 1980s inspired Ashley Kalagian Blunt to write My Name is Revenge (a finalist in the 2018 Carmel Bird Digital Literary Award). Full review at Newtown Review of Books
Posted by Karen
These people are real, this situation is real and in THE LOST MAN Harper has created another astounding work that perfectly evokes a complicated, heart-breaking, all-too-believable family tragedy.
Posted by Karen
... delivered in the classic pared down, matter of fact manner that's part of expectations that a reader is well within their rights to have when picking up the latest Wyatt novel.
Posted by Karen
This was a career criminal who seemed often to be inviting capture, whilst being equally clever – or charmed - at avoiding it.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
The author's bio mentions that S.D. Rowell is interested in the interplay between culture, morality and truth, explored in THE ECHO OF OTHERS. Can't disagree with any of that, THE ECHO OF OTHERS is an outstanding debut novel.
Posted by Karen
After listening to the first two books in the Lewis Trilogy pretty much one after the other, I've done it at all the wrong time of the year.
Posted by Karen
An excellent wartime thriller by Kate Atkinson.
Posted by Gordon Duncan
The best thriller you've never heard of, does such a thing exist? Kolymsky Heights may just be that book.
Posted by Gordon Duncan
Educational and informative true crime writing at it's best.
Posted by Karen
There's something very satisfying about the emergence of a new crime series set in Australia - this time 1960's Perth.
Posted by Karen
If you're a fan of fast paced, fun thrillers and haven't clued into the Jeff Bradley Thrillers from New Zealand based author Thomas Ryan yet then you are in for a treat.
Posted by Karen
One reader's darkly comic domestic noir is another reader's vegan sausage.
Posted by Karen
Into everyone's life a Cass Tuplin should blunder, yoyo's in hand, sorting it out once and for all on her mind.
Posted by Karen
It's been way too long for such an impressive book to garner a mention hereabouts.
Posted by Karen
Listening to this in the car was both a joy and a threat to life and limb.
Posted by Karen
... an effective playout of tension and unpredictability in the plot and THE GIRL IN KELLERS WAY is worthwhile pursuing - for fans of domestic noir and psychological thrillers.
Posted by Karen
This second book in the Ted Conkaffey series clearly demonstrates why Candice Fox has won two Ned Kelly Awards for crime writing. Full Review: Newtown Review of Books

Posted by Karen
Sometimes you start reading a series book about a favourite character, and really start to wonder if the author is annoyed with them, subconsciously punishing them for being too popular, or just enjoying applying the thumb screws for a change.
Posted by Karen
Find out where it all began for George Smiley.
Posted by Gordon Duncan
A debut police procedural from Melbourne based, ex-Ballarat dweller, JM Simpson, A BODY OF WORK makes good use of both of those locations. (Review republished / book republished).
Posted by Karen
You have to hand it to our Rebus. No one sidelines this particular Scotsman. If there’s something going on in his town, retired or not, Rebus still manages to place himself in the thick of it.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Could you walk the along the East Coast of Australia from Gippsland to Sydney? In 1797 seventeen shipwreck survivors set out on this journey, only three survived. One of the men has a diary which tells their tale, Preservation tells a much darker tale.
Posted by Gordon Duncan
A really good choice for fans of legal thrillers in particular, and a good one for fans of general Australian thrillers as well.
Posted by Karen
NO ONE CAN HEAR YOU has moments of great insight and clarity into the nature of small towns, small communities, and the people who can slip under the radar in those situations.
Posted by Karen
There's a good sense of the place, the climate, the local residents and the terrain in INTO THE FOG. It's a real strength of this novel - this is a place that Wallace obviously knows well and the idea that kids could simply vanish up there makes sense, and is well supported by the god awful weather that's being experienced.
Posted by Karen
Another day, another school shooting.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
As always, debut novels need a little slack cut, and there is potential here
Posted by Karen
If you discovered the murdered body of your married lover on a secluded beach would you hope no-one was watching and run?
Posted by Gordon Duncan
While there was little doubt after her debut, The Lost Man shows Harper cementing her place as a major, important talent in Australian crime fiction.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Cold-case detectives are everywhere these days, but the latest creation from Garry Disher, Alan Auhl, is not as straightforward as some might expect. Full review at Newtown Review of Books
Posted by Karen
Ted Lewis's Jack's Return Home, the book which Get Carter, arguably one of the greatest gangster films of all time, was based upon.
Posted by Gordon Duncan
The members of the Booker Prize Committee were very proud of themselves when they longlisted a crime novel for the 2018 Booker.
Posted by Robert Goodman
Having now listened to the first couple of books in the series, I think I'll stick with them in audio format as the dialogue, the place names, even the thought patterns of the characters are quintessentially Scottish and part of the enjoyment was hearing it in just the right accent.
Posted by Karen
There's plenty to this plot, to Sam Andie himself, and to events around the time that he was murdered to keep a reader involved and occupied.
Posted by Karen
ABSOLUTE PROOF is a rare thing in these parts - a "did not finish".
Posted by Karen
This is an embarrassingly overdue mention of the second novel in a series which is going from strength to strength.
Posted by Karen
On the lighter than air side of the cozy spectrum this is a series that will appeal to readers who like a bit of self-aware silly in their crime fiction.
Posted by Karen
Hard going, with an authentic voice that makes it emotionally challenging and confronting, COLOMBIANO is well worth pursuing - even if the size is off-putting. This reads, feels and is telegraphed in the prologue as something this author was passionately driven to produce.
Posted by Karen
When Ladd is exploring that central idea - "what happens when what is lost is found" - THE WAY BACK is indeed powerful. Moving, confronting, and very powerful.
Posted by Karen
There were so many reasons I wanted to love GET POOR SLOW.
Posted by Karen
The second novel in the Monsarrat series, THE UNMOURNED is set in Sydney, based around the Parramatta Female Factory - the epitome of appalling institutions in a line up that you'd think would be hard to lead.
Posted by Karen