Latest Reviews

Emma Viskic's second Caleb Zelic novel.
Posted by Gordon Duncan
THE PROMISED LAND delivers another confident dose of elegantly constructed crime writing that is both insightful and challenging to unravel. Tuck yourself in, you’re in good hands.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
It is impossible to escape your own past. That other self, the one you were before, will always be with you, wherever you go. Attempt to shake her off to your peril.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
The new ‘horror’ is in acknowledging what is happening in the world today, in our supposedly advanced age. We’ve come so far, but so far in aid of whom exactly?
Posted by Andrea Thompson
CALL ME EVIE is however a powerful psychological thriller, exploring the complications of memory (as hinted at in the opening quotations). But it's memory in all it's false, guilty, happy, searching, fragmented, convenient and confrontational guises.
Posted by Karen
Winner of the 2018 Ned Kelly Award.
Posted by Gordon Duncan
The strength of RIVER OF SALT is definitely in the idea of a stranger in a strange land, back in the days when communications weren't instant, and people could reinvent themselves to some extent. It's exploring just how far you can go with that idea, and how much of the old you will never go away.
Posted by Karen
When you are next thinking of accessing a portal to another dimension, perhaps you should consider the shower block?
Posted by Andrea Thompson

Recommendations

Emma Viskic's second Caleb Zelic novel.
Winner of the 2018 Ned Kelly Award.
Peter Temple's 2nd novel and my latest summer favourite.
Holly Throsby's excellent 2nd novel.
I've been trying to think of somebody else that could write books about abalone fishing quotas, cricket, asylum seekers and now early white Australian settlement, convicts, rum runners and shipwrecks and make them all equally compelling, memorable, and ... crime fiction.
The murderous adventures of Maud, an 88 year lady living in Gothenburg, Sweden
The winner of the 2018 McIlvanney Prize for best Scottish crime book.
The second Jack Parlabane novel.

Latest Postings

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Another from the currently reading pile.
Posted by Karen
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Listening to this on audio for a change - first book in the DCI Daley series, that I confess to having randomly chosen from a list of audio books.
Posted by Karen
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One from the weekend's pile
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Author Karen Hamilton has done a bang up of making us like Juliette, despite her dangerous intentions and willingness to do what needs to be done. You will want to like this woman, but you will be frightened of her, and you will never ever want to be on her bad side.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
THE FAMILY NEXT DOOR reinforces the notion that despite being constantly surrounded by people, you can often feel alone. Deep suburbia provides such a huge source of material and is finally in drama fiction being recognized for that richness.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
Where are the women here? They support, they assist – and they prosecute. Accused of raping a young woman in an elevator at Parliament, James is suddenly no longer bullet proof. His wife is no longer by his side. His government may no longer be so benevolent. Those he crossed in the past will no longer be silent.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Books
Posted by Karen
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The latest from the NZ pile.
Posted by Karen
Books
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Particularly intriguing one from recent day's reading.
Posted by Karen
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Another from the New Zealand pile read over the weekend.
Posted by Karen
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Another from the weekend's New Zealand piles.
Posted by Karen
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Another from the weekend's pile of New Zealand fiction, the second in the Raymond Electromatic trilogy.
Posted by Karen
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One from a weekend's reading catch up on the New Zealand / Ngaio Marsh piles.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
I turn to these books partly for the plot, but mostly for the unapologetically grumpy Montalbano, the food porn, and the locations.
Posted by Karen
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Another from the New Zealand piles.
Posted by Karen
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Easter reading pile number whatever I'm up to now.
Posted by Karen
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Starting off with this one over the Easter long weekend.
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
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From the current reading pile.
Posted by Karen
Books
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Another from this year's very varied New Zealand stacks.
Posted by Karen
Books
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Another from the weekend pile
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
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Another from the weekend's pile (don't you love cool, slightly damp weekends!)
Posted by Karen
Books
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From this damp (YEAHHHH) weekend's reading
Posted by Karen
Books
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From the current pile.
Posted by Karen
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From the current reading pile.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
An accessible dip into the world of fan fiction, these 16 illustrated short stories are not just for lovers of Sherlock Holmes. Full Review at Newtown Review of Books
Posted by Karen
Books
Posted by Karen
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Blog entry
And finally, from the past weekend.
Posted by Karen
Blog entry
Another from the weekend's reading pile.
Posted by Karen
Blog entry
One from the weekend's pile.
Posted by Karen
Book Review
Engaged to be married to a wonderful woman, Finn has worked hard and built up enough cash reserves to be able to work from home, support his dog and live the quiet life in an English village. Life for Finn is extremely good. How quickly things can change.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
Four caravans, four families inside waking up to a horrifying new reality. They, their cars and caravans, even their pets, are no longer where they were located when everyone went to bed the night before.
Posted by Andrea Thompson
Book Review
It has been a very long time since Anna has been able to put foot outside her own door. But this does not mean that she does not observe life outside.
Posted by Andrea Thompson