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Set in 1930's Australia, this book is a combination crime fiction, combination historical look at a very worrying and frankly weird as period of Australian history - between the 2 world wars, the Fascist power struggle against the supposed Communist threat. 

From the Blurb:

Rowland Sinclair is an artist and a gentleman.  In Australia's 1930s, the Sinclair name is respectable and influential, yet Rowland has a talent for scandal.

Even with thousands of unemployed lining the streets, Rowland's sheltered world is one of exorbitant wealth, culture and impeccable tailoring.  He relies on the Sinclair fortune to indulge his artistic passions and friends ... a poet, a painter and a brazen sculptress.

Mounting tensions fuelled by the Great Depression take Australia to the brink of revolution.

Opening Lines:

It wasn't right.  He leaned to the left, squinting, but no change of perspective improved it.  Swearing at the canvas was also unlikely to hellp, but he tried that anyway.  A reasonable man would have walked away long ago.

BOOK DETAILS
BOOK INFORMATION
ISBN
978-0-9807418-1-0
Year of Publication
BLURB

In Australia’s 1930s, the Sinclair name is respectable and influential, yet the youngest son Rowland - an artist - has a talent for scandal.

Even with the unemployed lining the streets, Rowland lives in a sheltered world... of wealth, culture & impeccable tailoring with the family fortune indulging his artistic passions & friends… a poet, a painter & a brazen sculptress.

Mounting political tensions fuelled by the Great Depression take Australia to the brink of revolution. Rowland Sinclair is indifferent to the politics… until a brutal murder exposes an extraordinary & treasonous conspiracy.

“The real enemy is Labor’s Jack Lang and the Communist hordes into whose hands he plays… What say I introduce you to some chaps?”

“What chaps?”

“Right thinking men. Loyalists who love this country… Rowland, I think you could be moving with the wrong crowd.”

Comments

Submitted by Brian (not verified) on Tue, 16/08/2016 - 04:38 pm

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Loved this! I read it after finishing Kangaroo, and the Gentill book was a perfect continuation of this period and its politics.
I am about to start Decline in Prophets: can it be as good as AFRTM? Let us hope so.
And the ABC interview from the Margaret River writers' festival tells me I need the sixth book in the series: Errol Flynn?!

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